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For people who live with epilepsy and those who care for them, the word SUDEP is the one word that can strike fear into them.

Therefore the most natural reaction when this subject is approached is for them to switch off and shut down taking ignorance as bliss, if this is not acknowledged it will never happen to us!

And as tricky as this subject is we know that SUDEP CAN and DOES happen. So arming yourself with facts, knowledge and tools is key.

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This week we are celebrating 25 years since we launched our first version of our Companion product and the start of our journey of product innovation through to our full range of alarms and monitoring solutions that we have today. We are also celebrating the life of our founder David Godfrey who sadly passed away at this time last year.

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Epilepsy is one of the most complex medical conditions in the world. This makes it difficult for even healthcare professionals to understand, let alone patients and families living with the condition daily.

Just when you think you are starting to understand your condition, you are often thrown a curveball and your seizure type or pattern changes, or a medication you have been successfully using for years stops working.

Epilepsy is difficult to predict and you often find yourself second guessing when a seizure may strike. Often when you are ill, overtired, stressed or have a sudden change to your everyday routine, seizures can become more frequent. But you also have those seizures that can happen without warning and with no rhyme or reason behind them, leaving you pondering if anything has changed lately that may have triggered them.

The fact is that there are so many varying types of epilepsy from genetic conditions you are born with, to a brain illness or injury that causes a sudden onset of epilepsy at any point in your life. This makes it difficult for some people to understand their epilepsy and what types of seizures they may have.

What makes it even harder is the fact that over the years some terminology has changed that describes seizures, so you may hear different words to describe your specific seizure type and not understand the meanings, or if in fact they are describing the same type of seizure just with using different words.

As with everything, knowledge is the key and the more you understand about epilepsy the better informed you can be to choose the right help and support for you and your family and tap into services and products available to help you live your life to the full. We have tried to break down the language barrier with this handy guide to seizure types and terminology so that you can understand epilepsy a little bit better.

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The Best SUDEP Awareness Advice?

Bring it out of the shadows.

As part of SUDEP Awareness Day on 23rd October our team is on a mission to raise as much SUDEP Awareness and supporting those living with epilepsy. We?ve dedicated this month?s blog and social media content to raising SUDEP Awareness and encourage as much online conversation about it as possible.?So please SHARE this onwards to help educate the world with us!

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“Our daughter Sinead had been experiencing fairly regular epileptic seizures as a result of an acquired brain injury she suffered at 6 weeks old (in addition to other disabilities that resulted from her injury). Despite taking medication, she continued to have seizures without warning through both day and night, which increasingly occurred at night time as she grew older. In my attempts to be there when my daughter needed me, I tried a baby monitor with a camera, but as her seizures weren?t accompanied by noises, the monitor did not wake us up as we?d hoped. We searched unsuccessfully for a long time for a ?gadget? that could help us to keep Sinead safe so it was a massive relief to finally discover that the Companion was out there and could potentially help us!”

Following the recent release of a report on behalf of the NHS and Scottish Government about?Epilepsy Alarms we take a look at the report?highlights and respond to some of the findings.?The report includes a few concerns for those 45% that currently own an alarm and details of those that do not.

Report prepared by Reme Diaz Scottish Government, Health Analytical Services (Spring 2014)

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